Bigger is no longer better? Samsung changes strategy

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In recent years, we saw how smartphones were increasing in size, and identify which was a low-end phone, medium or high was almost a mathematical question: the larger, better specs.

Samsung Galaxy Grand

Companies like Samsung, HTC and Nokia, were presenting their flagship phones more and more inches on its screen, as part of the renovation, increased performance and improved technical features, making the larger equipment, the greater has market value, and thus more aspirational.

But now, manufacturers began to change its strategy, observing what happens especially in emerging markets, where Premium phones have a much smaller share, and seeking to offer aspirational products at lower cost.

The Samsung Galaxy Grand is a clear example, with 5 inches (the same as the flamboyant Galaxy S4) provides benefits much lower, the screen has a resolution of just 480 x 800, compared to S4 1080 x 1920, memory is 8GB and 8 megapixel camera. With these much smaller specifications, Samsung gets midrange phone look high-end equipment.

But Samsung has not been alone with that, and they just announced new equipment along these lines. The Galaxy Mega is 5.8 inches and a screen resolution falls short of HD. The rest of the specs are typical of an average smartphone.

Galaxy Win

Galaxy Win is another example, with 4.7-inch WVGA resolution, offers 5 megapixel camera and a processor of 1.2 GHz, reaffirming this new trend of great size, but middle-range specifications.

Nokia is also making changes, and since the launch of the Lumia line, the larger, better specs, something that changed with the recently announced Lumia 520, the cheapest phone of Lumia history raising its 4-inch screen, taking larger than the 620, a smartphone that offers more features.

From now on, we will see more and more phones of large size and specifications not so premium, and this strategy could expand to more manufacturers, if its success is proven.

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